A little bit more about me.

I grew up in an Asian family and as with typical Asian parents, you’re expected to excel in school and eventually get a degree in either Medicine, Engineering or Law.

Suffice to say I did none of that.

However, being a typical Asian, I was somewhat a smarty-pants, being top of the class (sometimes year), getting straight A’s in major exams. I proved to be rather intellectual.

With the way the education system in Malaysia works, if your results are better than average, you’re almost automatically assigned to the “Science Stream” for the remaining two years of secondary school. The only other option would be the “Arts Stream” which is actually Accounting rather than Creative Arts.

I just went along with it because I was genuinely interested in science subjects and I didn’t have to compromise learning English and History, which I enjoyed as well.

Then came A Levels.

It all happened so fast. Within the first month, I had to already decide which A Level subjects to study that would collectively be a leverage for me to study a uni degree that was also sort of decided there and then.

So I said goodbye to History and Literature — which I thought I could be superwoman and take them as “minor” subjects (girl, this ain’t America) — and just took up Biology, Chemistry and Math.

Science = security. Right?

I didn’t do as well as was expected of me but I scraped good enough grades for me to go to Durham.

And oh boy, University was tough.

Long story short, I graduated with a BSc Natural Sciences in Biology and Chemistry. Again, I didn’t do as well as was expected of me.

Towards the end of my 3rd year, I gradually lost interest in those subjects, or so I thought. In retrospect, I actually lost purpose, or rather I didn’t have one. It was at this time that I started getting into mindfulness and so I began questioning everything.

It’s both good and bad, but definitely necessary.

Regardless of my decisions, I’m still a geek at heart and because of science, I’ve cultivated a massive appreciation for the natural environment.

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